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Experts in Commercial Disputes

Our Business group is well-known for its practical advice, sector knowledge and excellent commercial instincts. We regularly act for clients in industries including Banking & Financial Services, Construction & Engineering, Healthcare and Property.

In approaching a commercial dispute our barristers not only consider the legal technicalities, but also the broader business considerations, such as reputational issues, implications for commercial relationships and what it will cost you, in time and money.

We regularly act in all levels of domestic courts and tribunals, but will also explore alternative and recommend alternative approaches, such as arbitration, mediation and pre-action negotiation.

Here are some examples of our recent work:

  • Bayley v SG Associates EWHC 782 (Ch):- Gabriel Buttimore – a derivative claim brought by beneficiaries of a BVI trust against professional advisor to the trust for professional negligence and loss to the trust fund. Damages of £1m were awarded including interest.

  • Eugene McLaughlin and others v Bradbury & Co Limited/Sunday Solutions Limited (claim HC10C00779) – Christopher Mann - Claim on behalf of over 80 IT contractors for restitution/ damages/tracing and other equitable remedies; action issued in 2010 and currently stayed following a public interest winding up petition presented against the defendant companies; several interlocutory hearings concerning Bankers Book/injunctive/ disclosure applications.


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News & events

Can you trust a notice to quit?

Can you trust a notice to quit?

Michael Grant discusses the recent High Court decision in Procter v Procter and others [2022] EWHC 1202.


Published: 30th May 2022

WELLS V DEVANI

WELLS V DEVANI

Laura Giachardi was instructed as junior counsel by the appellant Mr Devani, in his successful appeal to the Supreme Court on the fundamental matters of interpretation and implied terms in contract law.


Published: 13th Feb 2019

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